Surgical Forceps Names


Forceps are surgical instruments categorized under ‘handheld hinged instruments’. Forceps are applied in surgical settings for holding and grasping various objects. In some cases forceps are used when objects are too small to be grasped by fingers. Alternatively, when a surgeon needs to hold multiple objects while performing other important tasks related to surgery, forceps are used. Due to the wide range of different requirements, a variety of forceps have been developed for regular use during surgery. Some of these forceps include dissecting forceps, thumb forceps, hemostatic forceps, Adson forceps, dental forceps and artery forceps etc. In common language, forceps are often referred to as clips, tongs, tweezers, clamps or pliers

Some important types of forceps are discussed below;

Adson dressing forceps have serrated tips and they are used for applying dressings and grasping tissues. Their length is 4.75 inches.

Adson tissue forceps are also called rat-tooth forceps. They consist of 1x2 teeth and they are used during wound closure for grasping skin tissue. Their length is 4.75 inches.

Allis consists of angled or straight tip having 2 to 6 teeth on opposing sides. They are used for grasping tissues when removing them from the body. Their length ranges from 6 inches to 10 inches.

Babcock consists of a fenestrated tip containing no teeth. They are used for grasping delicate tubular structures of the body. Their length ranges from 6 inches to 9 inches.

Blake gallstone forceps have curved or straight tips. They are used for removing gallstones from gallbladder during surgery. Their length is 8.5 inches.

Bonney tissue forceps consist of 2x3 or 1x2 teeth. They are used for grasping bone or for handling heavy tissues of the body. The length of this instrument is 7 inches.

Brown thumb forceps are also called brown tissue forceps. They consist of 8x8 teeth and they are used for grasping different body tissues. Their length is 6 inches.

Brown-Adson forceps (also called Adson-Brown forceps) consist of 7x7 teeth and they are used for grasping delicate tissues of the body during surgery. Their length is 4.75 inches.

DeBakey tissue forceps are also called DeBakey atraumatic vascular forceps. Their tip, which may be angled or straight, is wide (1.5mm-3.5mm) consisting of 1x2 serrations, which is used for grasping fine tissues of the body. Their use is common in nearly every type of surgery performed in surgical settings. Their length may range from 6 inches to 12 inches.

Dressing forceps are also called smooth forceps. They may have atraumatic heavy or fine tips and they are used for applying dressings and grasping tissues. They are available in different sizes ranging from 6 inches to 10 inches.

Ferris Smith tissue forceps consist of 1x2 or 2x3 teeth. They are used for grasping bone or other heavy tissues. The length of this instrument is 7 inches.

Fletcher-Van Doren Sponge holding forceps have a curved or straight tip containing serrations. They are used from grasping uterine polyps and for holding Kittner sponges that are used for blunt dissection. The length of this instrument is 9.5 inches.

Iris forceps consist of a curved tip with 1x2 teeth. They are used for grasping delicate tissues. Their length is 4 inches.

Kochers are also called Rochester-Ochsner. They consist of 1x2 teeth and a serrated surface. They are used for grasping heavy tissues like fascia etc. The length of this instrument ranges from 5.5 inches to 10 inches.

Lahey goiter forceps, also called Lahey thyroid tenaculum, consists of 3x3 teeth. They are used from grasping tissues while their removal is being carried out. The length of this instrument is 6 inches.

Magil catheter introducing forceps are also called intubating forceps. They consist of a rounded fenestrated tip containing serrations. The body of these forceps is angled to allow ease of use. They are used for grasping catheters during catheterization or endotracheal tube during intubation. They range in length from 6 inches to 9.75 inches.

Pennington forceps consist of triangular jaws, which are used for grasping tissues during abdominal surgeries like cesarean section, or intestinal surgery. The length of this instrument ranges from 6 inches to 8 inches.

Randall forceps are also called kidney stone forceps. Their tip is fenestrated and curved. They are used from grasping polyps or stones. Their length ranges from 7.5 inches to 9 inches.

Russian forceps consist of a round serrated tip. They are used for grasping different tissues. Their length ranges from 6 inches to 12 inches.

Singley tissue forceps are also called Singley Tuttle forceps. Their tip is serrated and consists of fenestrated jaws. They are employed for grasping sponges as well as intestinal tissues. The length of this instrument is 9 inches.

Tissue forceps, also called toothed forceps, pick-ups or rat-tooth, have 1x2 teeth. They are used during wound closure for grasping tissue. They are available in sizes ranging from 6 inches to 10 inches.

References

NEMITZ, R. (2014). Surgical instrumentation: an interactive approach. St. Louis, Mo, Elservier/Saunders.

RUTHERFORD, C. J. (2012). Differentiating surgical instruments. Philadelphia, F.A. Davis.


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